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Going in Depth on Home Inspections

Jessica Evans

Jessica fell in love with D.C.’s unique neighborhoods while attending the University of Maryland...

Jessica fell in love with D.C.’s unique neighborhoods while attending the University of Maryland...

Oct 14 3 minutes read

Here’s everything you’ll need to know about home inspections.



Most people have a general idea of what a home inspection is, but they're usually a little anxious about it when buying or selling a home.  I want to share more information about home inspections today.

A home inspection is a visual inspection of a home from a licensed home inspector. They go into a house to look at and test everything. That includes appliances and mechanical systems. When they look at the structure of the home, they look for signs of leaks. Some inspectors may even use thermal imaging or a drone to see details. Basically, they’ll check anything that can be seen without cutting open walls or disturbing the seller's belongings.

A buyer’s home inspection provides them with the information they need to make an informed decision. It's not going to find every flaw or issue, but that's just the reality of it. Home inspectors will often recommend that a licensed tradesperson be brought in to evaluate it if something does not appear to be working properly, and home inspection reports often have recommendations for what should be evaluated. It's important to take those steps for preventative maintenance and make sure everything's in working order.

I think sellers are afraid of home inspections for good reason. As agents, we’ve all had transactions where buyers have submitted requests for repairs that aren’t within the scope of an inspection contingency. When a seller has taken their house off the market and is planning to sell it to a buyer who asks for upgrades, that can be really frustrating. I think that is one of the reasons why contracts without inspection contingencies have become so popular. However, things like bringing something up to code aren’t realistic for older houses. The purpose of an inspection or requesting inspection repairs is not to turn a 1940s house into a 2020 house.


"A buyer’s home inspection provides them with the information they need to make an informed decision."


A good rule of thumb when you get an inspection report back is if something isn’t in working order and wasn’t disclosed by the seller, it makes sense to ask them to fix it. Things like cleaning or cosmetic improvements are not within the scope of a home inspection. Have realistic expectations as a buyer and seller to make the process as smooth as possible.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to me. I’m here to help you reach your real estate goals. I look forward to hearing from you and answering any questions you may have.

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